Economics of Pre-Primary Education in Thailand

Authors

  • Piriya Pholphirul Graduate School of Development Economics, National Institute of Development Administration (NIDA) and the International College of National Institute of Development Administration (ICO NIDA), Bangkok 10240.
  • Siwat Teimtad Graduate School of Development Economics, National Institute of Development Administration, Bangkapi, Bangkok 10240.

Keywords:

Pre-Primary Education, Long-Term Impacts, Education Performance, Thailand.

Abstract

Several research papers have assessed the long-term benefits of pre-primary education in terms of academic performance and labor market outcomes. This study analyzes data obtained from the Program for International Student Assessment (PISA) to estimate the effects of preschool enrollment of Thai students on producing long-term benefits in their academic performance. Results show that a mother’s educational attainment has a significant impact on the decision to enroll her child in preschool. Regarding the long-term benefits, our findings show that pre-primary education bears a significant and positive association with cognitive skills in all three areas of literacy tested under PISA, namely, reading, mathematics, and the sciences. Regarding the economic status of students’ families, results indicate that the benefits of pre-primary education in cognitive skill improvement tend to be greatest in the case of students from low- to middle-income families. Evidence supports the promotion of long-term benefits of pre-primary education and, thus, the universal early childhood education policy. In particular, support should be given to childhood education programs that specifically target children from disadvantaged groups and low-income households.

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How to Cite

Pholphirul, P., & Teimtad, S. (2016). Economics of Pre-Primary Education in Thailand. Applied Economics Journal, 23(1), 1–34. Retrieved from https://so01.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/AEJ/article/view/62212

Issue

Section

Research Articles